NFL

Chris Berman shares thoughts on having Joe Namath by his side for Monday Night Countdown

Joe Namath (left) with Chris Berman.
Joe Namath (left) with Chris Berman.

ESPN’s longtime NFL host Chris Berman has covered 34 Super Bowls, hosted Sunday NFL Countdown for 32 seasons and emceed the Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony for 17 years. While there are so many great games and other major NFL milestones that Berman has covered during his legendary broadcasting career, it’s the relationships he’s developed through the years that are most important to him.

For nearly four decades, Berman has been privileged to work with and meet numerous star players and distinguished coaches. This fall some of his favorites are visiting ESPN on Monday nights as part of Berman’s Monday Night Countdown NFL Legends tour. And this Monday’s guest might just be his favorite of all.

New York Jets Hall of Famer and Super Bowl champion quarterback Joe Namath will spend the entire Countdown show (Oct. 17, 6 p.m. ET) in-studio with Berman to preview that night’s Monday Night Football game between the Jets and the Arizona Cardinals.

Berman discusses Namath’s football legacy and how much he’s looking forward to having him in-studio:

“A half century later, the name Joe Namath is still magic. The way he played quarterback remains the image of the New York Jets, the upstart AFL [American Football League], and the era of the 60s and 70s. The Jets’ win in Super Bowl III remains pro football’s biggest upset and most important game ever. Joe’s Hall of Fame career inspired millions, and I ought to know. He made me love pro football and aspire to cover the game for a living. I’m so thrilled that he will spend this Monday in the studio with us. For me, it will truly be a personal and professional highlight.”

So far this season, Berman has welcomed Hall of Famers Mike Ditka and Michael Irvin and Super Bowl champions Joe Theismann and Dick Vermeil. Upcoming guests include Buffalo Bills Hall of Famers Jim Kelly (Oct. 31) and Bruce Smith (Nov. 7).

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