Behind The ScenesESPN.com

Ex-All Ivy League running back Scales now getting reps via ESPN the Fellowship

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the second in a two-part series on the first two recipients of ESPN the Fellowship. Adrienne Lawrence was recently featured in Part 1.

You run the full gamut when you’re in digital, where you’re doing interviews on any and every topic or sport, and now in the highlight factory, touching every single sport as well.
– Treavor Scales

When he started as one of the first two recipients of ESPN the Fellowship in September 2015, Treavor Scales had plenty of sports knowledge but had never been in an on-air role.

Now, more than 14 months into a two-year program, Scales has gained broadcasting experience and is appreciative of the opportunities and mentoring that have come his way.

ESPN the Fellowship is a recruiting initiative designed to help ESPN be proactive in the hiring and retaining of diverse candidates. Previously a crewing coordinator at ESPN (July 2013-15), Scales is a graduate of Harvard University where he was a four-time All-Ivy League running back.

His first assignment in the Fellowship was at ESPN New York 98.7 FM, where he made his on-air debut as a late-night update anchor and also had some co-hosting opportunities.

“That was one heck of an experience and one that really got the ball rolling,” Scales said.

Scales worked in New York until March, when he moved to ESPN headquarters in Bristol, Conn., and began the second phase of the Fellowship by working in ESPN Digital Production. He started by doing headlines for ESPN.com, pairing brief news story videos with talkback interviews with reporters or analysts working the story. Then he moved to voicing highlights, which he is doing now.

“You run the full gamut when you’re in digital, where you’re doing interviews on any and every topic or sport, and now in the highlight factory, touching every single sport as well,” he said.

When he finishes in digital, Scales will move to studio production, eventually doing SportsCenter updates.

“[ESPN anchors] Prim Siripipat and Cary Chow have been phenomenal with being an open book at all times for me to bounce ideas off of and coach me up,” he said. “And not just the on-air talent but the entire staff I’ve been working with.”

Did his experience as a college football player come in handy?

I think from the obvious, when I’m calling a college football highlight, I get to put down on the shot sheet a little bit more than others may be able to.
– Scales on whether his background as a football player helps in his ESPN role

“Oh no doubt,” he said. “I think from the obvious, when I’m calling a college football highlight, I get to put down on the shot sheet a little bit more than others may be able to.

“More importantly is being able to work within the team concept, understanding that there’s greater good,” he said. “If something goes wrong, it’s not about stopping everything and trying to call out somebody for whatever mishap may have occurred that’s no one’s fault.

“It’s just about powering through and being able to pick up when something else drops off, and just make everybody right,” he said. “Being able to work with individuals is what makes this place great, and the more that occurs, the better we all look.”

Close